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Find All Dates for Guided Walks on the Coast to Coast in 2018

Decide quick if you are planning to join a guided Coast to Coast walk this year.

Coast to Coast guided - Sherpa Expeditions

 

If you were planning to join a guided walk on Wainwright’s famous Coast to Coast path in 2018, we advise you to make a quick decision. Even before the exact dates for next year were announced, fellow walkers had already signed up for this popular walking holiday in the English Lake District.

 

Places on our guided Coast to Coast 2018 walks are selling out fast: the 18-day departure in May is on waiting list and we currently only have a couple of spots left for the 17-day departure in July/August. At the same time, we are happy to announce that in 2018 you can choose from four dates on the 15-day version of this stunning walk.

 

We hope that the below overview of all guided Coast to Coast walking holidays in 2018 comes in handy when planning your walking holiday for the coming summer.

 

Coast to Coast Guided Walk

15 days walking with departures on:

  • 10 June – 24 June >> Guaranteed
  • 15 July – 29 July
  • 5 August – 19 August
  • 9 September – 23 September

 

Coast to Coast Guided Explorer

17 days walking with a departure on:

  • 29 July – 14 August >> limited availability

 

Coast to Coast Guided Rambler

18 days walking with a departure on:

  • 6 May – 23 May >> waiting list

 

Individual walkers can choose from even more lengths to walk Wainwright’s Coast to Coast with durations between 8 to 18 days that depart between March until September. For more information, have a look at the complete overview of self guided walking holidays in the UK or contact our team of travel experts

 

10 Interesting Sights on the John Muir Way

Apart from the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of the ‘father of national parks’, there are plenty of other reasons to walk what is known as Scotland’s Coast to Coast. The John Muir Way stretches for 134 miles (215km) from Helensburgh in the West of Scotland to Durban in the East making it one of Scotland’s best known long distance trails. With so much length to cover, you conveniently will walk past many fascinating sights that make the John Muir Way a truly interesting walk to undertake.

 

From John Muir’s hometown and a Roman wall to the heritage of famous war poets and the world’s biggest Northern Gannet colony, read on for a sneak preview of the fascinating sights you will encounter along the John Muir Way.

 

1. John Muir’s Port of Departure

hometown of John Muir, Helensburgh - Sherpa Expeditions


Handsome buildings, wide elegant tree-lined streets, a long promenade and attractive parks & gardens create a pleasantly distinguished atmosphere in Helensburgh. It is from this town that the Muir family is said to have left to go to the USA. The town operated the world’s first steamship ferry service in 1812 and reputedly a quarter of Britain’s millionaires resided in this handsome holiday resort during Victorian times.

 

2. Carbeth Chalets

chalets on John Muir Way - Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays


After World War I local land owner, Barnes Graham, gave land near Glasgow to returning soldiers. The idea was for them to be able to build summerhouses so they could get some fresh air away from the city. The scheme at the time attracted socialists and communists and during WWII it was here that many people took refuge at the time of the Clydebank Blitz. Today, the low-impact lifestyle that people at the Carbeth Chalets follow is highly-prized and protected.

 

3. Kirkhouse Inn

Kirkhouse Inn on John Muir Way Scotland - Sherpa Expeditions


Originally built in 1601 as a stables and tavern, the Kirkhouse Inn has undergone several transformations over the years and has had its fair share of scandals and hidden treasures, even the sighting of a ghostly aberration! The Kirkhouse was the scene of secret correspondence between King James VI of Scotland and Queen Elizabeth I of England that eventually led to the Union of the Crowns.

 

4. The Antonine Wall

Antonine Wall, Scotland - Sherpa walking holidays


The northern-most limit of the Roman Empire stretched all the way to present-day Scotland. Like the better-known Hadrian's Wall to the south, it formed a solid barrier right across the country. The northern boundary can still be seen today when walking the John Muir Way and passing the Antonine Wall and Kirkintilloch fort. This is now a designated World Heritage Site. The Wall's location is prominently shown. A high mound in the park marks the site of a mediaeval castle whose moat still survives.


5. Falkirk Wheel

Falkirk Wheel, Scotland - Sherpa walking holidays


Opened in 2002 this is the world’s only rotating boatlift and an ‘engineering icon throughout the globe.’ Falkirk Wheel reconnects the canal of Forth and Clyde with the Union Canal for the first time since the 1930s and is part of the Millennium Link project. Inspirations for the design include a double-headed Celtic axe, the propeller of a ship and the ribcage of a whale.

 

6. The Ship that Never Sailed

John Muir Way - Blackness Castle, Scotland walking holidays


Blackness Castle is one of Scotland's most impressive strongholds. It was built in the 15th century by one of Scotland's most powerful families. Since it became crown property in 1453, the castle on the John Muir Way served as a state prison, one of the most advanced artillery fortifications of its time in Scotland, and ammunition depot. Because of its site and shape, Blackness Castle has been characterised as "the ship that never sailed".

 

7. The Kelpies

Kelpies on Scotland coast to coast - Sherpa Expeditions


Created by Scotland’s leading sculptor Andy Scott, The Kelpies are a monument to horse powered heritage across Central Scotland. They stand 30 metres tall and as such are the largest equine sculptures in the world. The Kelpies form a dramatic gateway to the canal entrance on the east coast of Scotland and you can take a tour to experience the horses from the inside.

 

8. Bass Rock

Bass Rock on John Muir Way in Scotland


This is the biggest Northern gannet colony in the world, home to over 150,000 gannets at the peak of the season. The gannets spend most of the year on the Bass Rock, until the end of October.  The lower ledges of the Bass are home to shags, guillemots and razorbills, with seals hauling up on the rocks below. All in all, a unique spot to take in on your John Muir Way walking trip.

 

9. The Haar

Walking Scottish Coast to Coast with Sherpa Expeditions


Along the Firth of Forth and down the coast to Dunbar, you may have to contend with ‘The Haar’. In good weather and low winds, it can give the impression that you are suddenly having terrible weather with fog banks and grey drizzly cloud. It is not an optical illusion; The Haar is a cold sea fog and usually occurs on the east coast Scotland between April and September.


10. Craiglockhart War Hospital

War poetry along John Muir Way - Sherpa Expeditions


Fans of war poets will be interested to know that when taking a little extra walk on the John Muir Way, you can end up at ‘Edinburgh Napier University.’ This was the famous Craiglockhart Psychiatric Hospital where Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon met in the First World War. Their poems appeared in the hospital's own magazine called ‘The Hydra’ and were the inspiration for several books and a movie.

 

 

For more information on walking the John Muir Way, the exact route and inclusions, please have a look at the trip page or get in touch with our team of travel experts in London. 


 

English Village Pub is Best Restaurant in the World

… and is located near one of England’s finest long-distance trails, The Cleveland Way

An English village pub has just been announced as the world’s Best Fine Dining Restaurant by TripAdvisor. The Black Swan in Oldstead, close to the start of our The Cleveland Way walking holiday, became number one in the TripAdvisor 2017 Traveller’s Choice awards for best restaurant in the world.

 

Best restaurant in the world on Cleveland Way ©Black Swan Oldstead

©Black Swan Oldstead

 

This is truly exciting news for numerous reasons. First of all, the award is won through reviews and opinions from visitors to the restaurant in North Yorkshire, feedback from previous guests is often a good indicator for what you may expect. On top of that, the restaurant actually has a Michelin Star and four AA Rosettes, which backs up their newly acquired status of best restaurant in the world.

 

As British food sometimes may be frowned upon by international visitors, we are particularly proud of the fact that the restaurant serves British cuisine and that the recognition is from a global poll of millions of reviews gathered over the period of a year. Possibly the home grown produce, often native to the region, and seasonal ingredients combined with the talent of the chef have added to the success.

 

Last but not least, the fact that the restaurant is just 15 minutes away from the start of our The Cleveland Way walking holiday and on the route to Leeds airport creates a perfect opportunity for an extra night before or after your North Yorkshire walking trip (or even your Coast to Coast holiday).

 

Food - Best restaurant in the world on Cleveland Way ©Black Swan Oldstead

©Black Swan Oldstead

 

Best restaurant in the world is on the Cleveland Way _ Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays

 

On their website, the Black Swan states: “For us, it's much more than just Michelin Star food. The focus is all about where we are and who we are - a reflection of "Oldstead" - traditional Yorkshire with a swirling mix of creativity and eccentricity.” 

 

The Cleveland Way

The Cleveland Way stretches 110 miles (177km) along coast and moorland and shares a small section of the Coast to Coast walk. The Cleveland Way is the second of the ‘National Trails’, dating from 1969 and is rooted in the North York Moors National Park / Yorkshire Heritage Coast. Find more information on the 12-day The Cleveland Way walking holiday here.

 

Black Swan, Oldstead, North Yorkshire

More information on the Black Swan and their newly acquired status of best restaurant in the world by TripAdvisor can be found in this article by the BBC.  


Dare to Walk the Zermatt Suspension Bridge?

With the new and world’s longest hanging pedestrian bridge, you have even more things to do in Zermatt and the Bernese Oberland

new Zermatt suspension bridge - Sherpa Expeditions

©Valentin Flauraud


With the world’s longest hanging pedestrian bridge opened near the village of Zermatt in July 2017, you may have another reason to visit Switzerland next summer. The Europaweg Skywalk, also known as the Randa Suspension Bridge or Charles Kuonen Suspension Bridge, is about 1/3 of a mile long and only 65 centimetres (25.6 inches) wide. To us, walking this new suspension bridge is certainly high on our list of the things to do in Zermatt.

 

The single-file, steel-made bridge offers spectacular views of the iconic Matterhorn and is hanging 278 feet up in the air. The bridge is designed “for hikers with no fear of heights.” On the 9-day Haute Route self guided walk and 8-day Bernese Oberland and Reichenbach Falls self guided and guided walking holidays in our offer, you will have a free day in Zermatt to walk the unique bridge. Travelling 15 minutes by train to Randa, you can enjoy an 8.7km circular walk.

If you feel this is all a little too much, Zermatt offers many more options to explore on a free day.

 

Contrasting rock with ice, the Bernese Oberland is ideal for first timers in the Swiss Alps or opt for the challenging Haute Route in the scenic canton of Valais – both trips conclude with a free day in Zermatt


Things to do in Zermatt under Matterhorn - Sherpa Expeditions


There are many things to do in Zermatt with Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays

 

The Swiss alpine town is traffic free and all-around Zermatt you will be able to enjoy a wonderful panorama of mountain peaks, including the distinctive shape of the Matterhorn. From the route notes you will receive upon booking a walking trip in the Bernese Oberland or the Haute Route, you will be able to choose from about four walks to take around Zermatt. On top of that, our team can advise on even more walks and activities to fill your day.

 

If you want to immerse yourself in the classic Swiss mountains capes, just have a look at the different walking holidays in Switzerland or contact one of our experienced travel advisors in London.

 

Other suspension bridges in Switzerland:


Bernese Oberland and Reichenbach Falls

A stunning region of rock and ice, Bernese Oberland is the perfect introduction to walking in the Swiss Alps, as each day you can choose between a range of walks, often with differing grades and distances. The route follows classic mountain trails to charming mountain refuges, with views along the way from a variety of vantage points of vast glaciers that tumble from some of the highest peaks in the country, many over 4,000m!

Bernese Oberland and Reichenbach Falls (8 days) departs each year between June-September 

Bernese Oberland and Reichenbach Falls – Guided (8 days) departs 11-18 August 2018 and similar dates each year

The Haute Route

The Haute Route is popular with skiers but there is also a walkers’ version. The scenic canton of Valais is one of the most majestic mountain regions in Europe – and compared to many other areas in Switzerland, most of the paths are little trodden! Come in the summer and you will pass under 10 of the 12 highest peaks in the Alps, visit quaint picture postcard villages, stroll through lush valleys and enjoy the colourful alpine flowers in bloom.

The Haute Route (9 days) departs each year between July-September

On Track – Q&A on Walking in Tenerife

To give you a deeper understanding of our cycling and walking holidays in Europe, we like to introduce you to the On Track feature. This is a series of quick Q&A’s on a specific trip from the Sherpa Expeditions offer.

Today’s FAQs (frequently asked questions) are answered by resident guide John, who is one of our experts on walking in Tenerife.

 

Hike up Mt Teide volcano in Tenerife - Sherpa walking holidays

 

#1 What aspects about the weather make Tenerife great for walking?

 

Tenerife has a pleasant sub-tropical climate with average daily maximums of over 20°C throughout the year, but it rarely gets too hot outside of high summer because of the prevalent north-easterly Trade Winds and because the island is cooled by the Canary Current. This means that temperatures are slightly cooler than would normally be expected at this latitude and keeps temperatures in the high-twenties rather than the mid-thirties.

The sun is very strong so you do need to use sunscreen and wear loose fitting clothes. The island is pleasant for walking year-round. Trekking on the coast and up in the mountains in winter time can be slightly colder due to winds and the altitude you gain.

 

#2 What is special about walking in Tenerife?

Clean air, fantastic lapis blue sea views over to other islands, extensive well waymarked trails, and the chance of finding a small bar or restaurant to take in a fish dish or tapas while drinking a nice glass of wine or golden beer. There is a great cheap bus service on Tenerife which enables you to really explore and do some full day walks. It doesn’t take too long to get to starting points and really get walking on some great mountain and coastal trails.

 

Walking in Tenerife - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Tenerife is great for year-round walking - Sherpa Expeditions

 

#3 What language do people speak?

Spanish is the language of Tenerife, with local dialects. It would be worth learning a few phrases in Spanish such as greetings, but many people who work in the hospitality sector speak some English. Being polite and asking if people understand English is always a virtue.

 

#4 As Tenerife is such a well-known island, are there still quiet places?

The island is quite densely populated on sections along the coast such as Los Cristianos, Puerto de la Cruz and Santa Cruz de Tenerife. There are also vast sections of cliffs and coast where there are just small holdings or wild terrain, you’ll discover these while walking in the Canary Island. In the interior of Tenerife, where the slopes of Mount Teide and the volcanic Caldera rise, there are very few settlements and it becomes a barren moonscape.

 

#5 Will we encounter other walkers on this trip in Tenerife?

The island of Tenerife is very popular with Dutch, German and British travellers. They usually come either for the beaches or for hiking and some of the paths do get a lot of traffic, but you will rarely feel as if you are in the crowds. At times around Mount Teide it can get busier due to the arrival of coach tourists.

 

Walking in Tenerife with Sherpa Expeditions

 

Try local food in Tenerife - Sherpa walking holidays

 

#6 To what other region in the world can you compare Tenerife?

Well, you can compare a walking trip in Tenerife to the other volcanic islands around: such as La Gomera, La Palma, Hierro, Gran Canaria, and of course Madeira and the Azores, although these latter are much greener islands. Then globally, you can compare the landscape to the volcanic areas in Central America: Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and parts of Mexico, these also have similar Spanish or Portuguese colonial heritage.

 

#7 What extra costs will I have on Sherpa’s Tenerife walking trip?

You can find very keenly priced restaurants and well-priced drinks as well as some very expensive places. What is nice is discovering a traditional restaurant that the locals are using and having a meal with a local wine for under EUR 25. Buses are cheap and you can purchase a Bono travel card for EUR 15-25 on arrival and keep it topped up for bus transfers. There is 1 bag transfer to Puerto de la Cruz (EUR 75) on day 3 of our Tenerife walking holiday, this has to be paid directly to your hotelier on arrival.

 

We hope this information has indeed answered some of the questions you may have had on walking in Tenerife. If you have other queries, please get in touch with John and the Sherpa team via phone or email.

 

Did you like this Q&A and would you like to get similar details of one of our other active Europe holidays? We’d be happy to hear about your suggestions.

Or if you like to be among the firsts to hear about the latest On Track Q&A destination, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter here.  

 

Waymarked trails in Tenerife for walking - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Pietra, the Corsican Chestnut Beer, Comes of Age!

With so many micro-breweries popping up these days, drinking a pint has been taken to the next level and many flavours and brews are available. From vanilla bourbon and cherries to citrus and chestnut beers, it seems there’s a beer to any taste.

 

The people around the Mediterranean were far ahead of their time and beer, known as the ‘liquid bread’, was an important part of people’s daily staple back in the day. It took however until 1996 for the island of Corsica to produce their own beer when Armelle & Dominique successfully opened their brewery. This year, at 21 years young, their first brew Pietra has come of age and is now typically found all over the Mediterranean island.


walking in Corsica with Sherpa Expeditions

 

The chestnut beer came about after several years of studying, testing and tasting, which taught the brewers that chestnut has good brewing qualities. Today, the nuts give the beer its beautiful golden colour and distinct taste. Some of the supply must definitely come from around the charming old chestnut town of Evisa on the westside of Corsica.


Prime spot for a chestnut beer when walking in Corsica - Sherpa Expeditions


Corsican chestnut beer (c)Brasserie Pietra

©Brasserie Pietra

 

Besides the offering of beer brewed with chestnuts, Corsica has always been a fascinating land with its 1,000km long coastline and more than 200 beaches that surround a mountainous (86 percent) interior. The Corsican mountains feature 21 summits of over 2,000m, as well as the GR20 (Grande Randonnée 20), the toughest long-distance trail in Europe and part of the European network of long distance trails. Another famous trail on the island is the Mare a Mare, or "Sea to Sea", which crosses the mountains from east to west. The island hosts lots of small festivals throughout the year and with its rich cultural heritage and dense forests is a fantastic walking destination.

 

Whether you are in search of a personal challenge or looking for an excuse to have an ice-cold ‘Pietra’ (the local beer made of chestnuts), finding a good reason to visit the third biggest island in the Mediterranean shouldn’t be difficult.  The 8-day Corsica: Mountains & Sea walking holiday departs until October this year and then again in May.

 

For more information or booking inquiries, please contact our team of travel experts in London.


Corsica walking holidays - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Madeira in Autumn: Apples, the Organ & More

Few places in Europe celebrate autumn in such a dynamic way as Madeira…

 

Through a wide range of festivals, you can experience a lively autumn in Madeira. Most likely, your main reason to visit Madeira in September, October & November is exploring the Portuguese island on foot. But there are many more things to do in Madeira in autumn besides navigating the island’s ancient levadas and walking paths. From wine and apple cider festivals to celebrating the organ and stunning nature, below find an overview of some of the festivals to attend this autumn.

 

Madeira Wine Festival

visit Madeira in September for the wine festival - Sherpa Expeditions


When >> 26 August – 09 September 2018

Where >> from Estreito de Câmara de Lobos to Funchal (start & finish of the Madeira Island Walking trip)

What >> The wine festival has been running since the '70s and coincides with the island’s Wine Harvest Festival, European Folklore Week and street entertainment in Funchal. Late August/early September is when the annual grape harvest takes place in Madeira and attending these is certainly a reason to plan your travel dates accordingly. There are musical performances, ethnographic parades, demonstrations of old-style viticulture tools and even the opportunity to join in treading the grapes!

More >> madeirawinefestival.com

 

Columbus Festival

plan your walking holiday in Madeira around Columbus Festival - Sherpa Expeditions

 

When >> 13-15 September 2018

Where >> the island of Porto Santo northeast of Madeira (ask our team for details on how to get there)

What >> The world-famous explorer once called home Porto Santo Island and each year in September, the island close to Madeira organises many events evolving around the epic Portuguese discoveries from the 15-16th century. You can for example witness the ‘disembarking of Columbus’, browse a 16th century market for food & craft, listen to orations as they were held at the time, and join in many of the other things to do at this time of year. Expect to be drawn back in time when visiting this small island close to Madeira in September.

More >> festivaldocolombo.visitmadeira.pt

 

Apple Festival & Apple Cider Festival

Madeira walking holidays and apple cider festival - Sherpa Expeditions


When >> 15 & 16 September 2018

Where >> Ponta do Pargo (on the far west of the island)

What >> In its 34th year in 2018, the Madeira Apple Festival is a rural event to celebrate the ‘pêro’ – what Madeirans commonly call the apple. The small festival takes place in Ponta do Pargo in the western tip of Madeira and attracts apple farmers from the surrounding farmsteads. Festivities usually include apple cider tasting, a street parade, exhibitions, and several musical performances. Besides the festival, Ponta do Pargo is a charming town to visit on its own. Or wait a few weeks for the annual Madeira Cider Festival in the weekend of 22 & 23 September. 

 

Madeira Nature Festival

madeira nature festival is one of the things to do in madeira in October - Sherpa walking holidays


When >> 2-7 October 2018

Where >> around the island of Madeira (check the stand at the Largo da Restauração for more info)

What >> Just like the Madeira Flower Festival in spring, the island’s nature festival celebrates all activities on the island that involve nature. The natural heritage of the island is rich thanks to its subtropical climate and rich volcanic soil and Madeira is even nicknamed ‘Garden Island’ or ‘Ilha Jardim’. Everything that you can do during the Madeira Nature Festival takes place on the land, in the air or in the sea and includes activities like birdwatching, mountain biking, levadas walks, sailing, and short leisure flights.

More >> madeiranaturefestival.visitmadeira.pt

 

Madeira Organ Festival

attend Madeira Organ Festival on a Madeira walking holiday


When >> normally at the end of October, exact dates for 2018 to be announced

Where >> Funchal, Machico & Porto da Cruz (which you’ll visit at the beginning of the walking holiday)

What >> The organ is a relatively unknown part of Madeiran heritage and can be found in several churches and cathedrals across the island. A series of 12 concerts will be held to showcase the instrument and beautiful music it can produce. The festival will have Portuguese and internationally renowned master organ players perform in stunning venues like the Cathedral of Funchal, College Church, Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe and Church of St Peter.

More >> festivaldeorgaodamadeira.com or on their Facebook page

 

Madeira is a year-round walking destination with pleasant temperatures to be in the outdoors and there are lots of things to in Madeira apart from walking. For more information and advice on planning your holiday, feel free to contact our team of travel experts in London.

The 8-day Madeira Island Walking holiday departs daily, year-round.

 

More Madeira

 

10 Things to Do in Majorca

Discover the Surprises of a Majorca Walking Holiday

When browsing through the images we took on our recent inspection of the paths and accommodation in Majorca, we can feel the travel bug start itching again. With so many fantastic places, viewpoints and things to do in Majorca, the island is a perfect getaway for a week of walking. Good times to visit are the European spring (March, April, May) and late summer or autumn (September & October).

 

Whether you are interested in culture and history, agriculture, nature and geography, or are a foodie, the island of Majorca, with all its different facets, offers something to any type of walker. To give you an idea, we wanted to share some of our images with you so that you can see for yourself all that you can do in Majorca on your walking holiday.

 

1.      Santuari de Lluc

Santuari de Lluc in Majorca - Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays

 

When you search for things to do in Majorca, one of the top highlights that come up is Santuari de Lluc, or Lluc Monastery – and rightfully so. The monastery in the north-west of the Spanish island is the most important pilgrimage site of Majorca and is surrounded by impressive high mountains, forests and a network of walking trails. The 13th century building offers a hospitable place to stay and will be your personal sanctuary at the start of your trip.

 

2.      Forests

forest walks in Majorca with Sherpa Expeditions

 

The northwest part of Majorca is the most forested and when walking in or out of the mountains, you’ll often find pretty holm oak forests, but also woods of myrtle, arbutus and pine. The forests that cover the hills of this part of the island hide some interesting features, such as a forest nursery with an educational building, the 500-year-old ‘Encina d’en Pere’ (Oak of St Peter), and several sitjes. A sitja is a circular earth mound ringed with stones, which was used to make charcoal. Sometimes you can even find the remains of a stone hut dwelling near such a sitja.

 

3.      Sierra Tramontana Mountain Range

Sierra de Tramontana is a must-see in Majorca _ Sherpa walking holidays

 

The Sierra Tramontana, or locally Serra de Tramuntana, forms the backbone of north-west Majorca. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and with 90km long it covers some 30% of the island and is home to several 1,000m peaks. The highest are Puig Major (1,443m), Puig de Massanella (1,348m), Serra d’Alfàbia (1,069m), Es Teix (1,064m) and Galatzó (1,026m) and we recommend ascending the peaks of Es Teix and Puig de Massanella for impressive scenery and views.

 

4.      Església de St Bartomeu

Visiting the St Bartholomew church is one of the things to do in Majorca with Sherpa Expeditions

 

The façade of this cathedral on the main square of the picturesque town of Soller is designed by Juan Rubio, a follower of Antonio Gaudi who designed the world-famous Sagrada de Familia in Barcelona. The church was built before 1236 and has seen several amendments over the years. It has features of different architectural styles and part of the Church of St Bartholomew even made up a section of Soller’s defence wall. Inside, the rose window with its stained glass is beautiful.

 

5.      Wine & Vineyards

vineyards in Majorca - Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays

 

Perhaps less expected, but Mallorca is home to two wine-growing regions. A little south from the route of our walking holiday, you can find several vineyards that are part of the Vino de la Tierra Serra de Tramuntana – Costa Nord. There also are the more inland vineyards, which are part of the Binissalem Denomination of Origin. It is believed that wine was introduced to the island by the Romans back in the 15th or 16th century. Why not try some local wine during one of your meals...

 

6.      Trails & Coastal Walkways

Discover coastal trails on a Majorca walking holiday - Sherpa Expeditions

 

In Mallorca, the main walking routes are part of the GR (Gran Recorrido, or in French Grande Randonnée) network, which stands for long distance paths. Virtually all the walking we do in Majorca is carried out on this network of paths and trails, and wherever possible, we avoid the use of tarmac roads. With the peaks of the Sierra de Tramontana on one side and the north-west coast of Majorca on the other, this is one of the most spectacular coastlines of the Mediterranean. Walk in Majorca and you will follow bare mountain paths, the Archdukes’ Way and even an old mule path, interchanged by shaded forest paths and trails through terraces of olive, orange and almond groves.

 

7.      Valldemossa

Visit Valldemossa as one of the things to do in Majorca - Sherpa Expeditions

 

The villages of the mountains, such as Valldemossa, Soller, Deia, Biniaraix and Fornalutx are particularly attractive, with their mellow stonewalls and flower-bedecked balconies. In Valldemossa we’ll stay in one such old house with good views over the village and surrounding hills. The town used to be home to Chopin and his mistress George Sand and the monastery where they used to live is now a museum open to the public. Out of Valldemossa, you can also follow the Camino de Arxiduque (Archduke’s Way), which is one of the first examples of a path built for recreational purposes.

 

8.      Oranges & Orange Groves

Oranges in Majorca - Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays

 

The descend into Soller town from Mirador de ses Barques, is a very pleasant walk amid orange and lemon groves. You’ll walk through the town’s important history as Soller prospered because of the export of oranges. You’ll be able to get a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice for just a couple of euros, or try the locally produced orange liqueur. Another thing to do in Soller is to take the tourist train to La Palma. Originally, the tramway was built in the early 1900s by orange growers to transport their fruits to the port of La Palma. We think the scenery is worthy and it makes for a enjoyable return day trip.

 

9.      Seafood & Grilled Meats

Enjoy local cuisine as one of the things to do in Majorca - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Majorcan cuisine is hearty with plenty of grilled meats marinated in garlic and chunky stews loaded with fresh vegetables providing you with the perfect source of energy to get you through a day of walking. Since Majorca is an island, seafood is also a common staple throughout. Sea bream and monkfish are the two most popular fish dishes served grilled and smothered in all kinds of exciting sauces. 

 

10.   Casa de Robert Graves

visit Casa de Robert Graves on a Majorca walking holiday - Sherpa Expeditions

 

In Deia, close to Soller, you’ll find the house where Robert Graves (1895-1985) lived on and off for 52 years. The famous British poet and author served in the British army during WWI, studied at Oxford University, and moved to Majorca in 1929. In his house in Deia he wrote two extremely successful historical novels, I Claudius (1934) and Claudius the God (1934), which were the base for a popular television series in both the UK and USA. A visit to Casa de Robert Graves allows you to tour the house and garden to experience it as it was in the mid-40s. 

 

Visit Majorca on a walking holiday with Sherpa Expeditions for a piece of mind and to have your accommodation booked, bags transferred and maps & route notes in hand. 

 

If you like to enquire about the possibilities of walking in Majorca or like to learn more about the 8-day Majorca: Sierras and Mountains holiday, do get in touch with our team of travel experts and they will be happy to assist you more. 

 

New! Active UK Holidays for 2018

New walking holidays for 2018 - Sherpa Expeditions UK

 

From spring next year (2018), you will have even more choice to go on an active holiday in the UK as we will be launching several brand-new trips again.

Next year, we will be adding three new walking programmes spread out over England and the isles, plus a completely renewed cycling holiday that will follow one of the UK’s most popular walking trails.

 

New walking holidays - Sherpa Expeditions UK

 

New walking holidays in the UK with Sherpa Expeditions

 

Isle of Man Coastal Path >> new walking holiday

  • Beautiful Coastal scenery on quiet trails
  • Cultural heritage towns such as Castletown, Peel, Ramsey and Laxey
  • Wildlife spotting opportunities
  • Seascapes embracing views to England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland
  • Bathing opportunities
  • A network of steam, electric, mountain and horse drawn railways
  • Interesting histories to discover

>> View this new self guided walking trip in England now

 

The Richmond Way >> new walking holiday

  • Magnificent Lancaster, Bolton and Richmond castles and the 'motte' (remains) of several others
  • Ingleton Village and waterfalls
  • Walking on ancient Roman roads
  • Beautiful 'Green' villages such as Bainbridge and Reeth
  • High limestone walking with views over the Yorkshire fells
  • Beautiful valleys of Wensleydale and Swaledale
  • Ribblehead Viaduct – a mecca for railway enthusiasts

 

The Cyclist’s Coast to Coast >> new cycling holiday

  • Ride across England from Irish to the North Sea, crossing the Lake District and Pennines
  • Biking through the hills & dales of northern England
  • Attractive hamlets and traditional villages
  • Industrial heritage, lead mines and the River Tyne
  • A satisfying and very challenging ride

>> View this new self guided cycling trip in England now

 

Jersey Island – Channel Island Way >> new walking holiday

  • Discover legacy of wars, occupations & pirates
  • Second part of the Channel Island Way
  • Magnificent rock pools & sweeping dunes
  • Follow rugged cliff paths sprinkled with wildflowers
  • Charming seaside pubs & fishing villages

>> View this new self guided cycling trip in England now

 

We are currently finalising the details for these new trips, so stay tuned on this page (perhaps you like to bookmark it) for updates and to find out when the trips are available next year. 

 

New Coast to Coast cycle holiday - Sherpa Expeditions UK

 

If you like to enquire or like us to send you a message as soon as the trips are available online, please contact our team of travel experts in London.

 

A Guernsey Event: Food & Views

Guernsey is well known for its beautiful scenery and fantastic food, so why not join the two together on your next trip to the island?

Walking in Guernsey events - Food Festival

 

Since 2015, Guernsey Island hosts the 2-week long Guernsey Food Festival in September. The event aims to support local food and drink producers as well as showcase the island’s wide variety of fresh produce, fabulous restaurants, well-known chefs and local delicacies. A visit to the island at this time of year is the perfect chance to taste all that Guernsey has to offer.

 

The festival includes plenty of events around the island for all to enjoy, ranging from beer-and-cheese-pairing to chilli-eating competitions. As different events are dotted around the island, it’s the perfect excuse to try Sherpa's great walking itinerary and burn off some of the delicious food.

 

Food demonstration event in Guernsey - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Guernsey walking holidays - Food Festival Guernsey - Sherpa Expeditions

 

The first weekend of the festival usually focuses around the Big Guernsey Market, where more than 40 food and drink stalls display the best of Guernsey cuisine along Crown Pier. There are also opportunities to join a boat trip around the oyster beds of Herm to see the island’s delicious delicacy of the Herm and Rocquaine oysters, or if you prefer to stay on solid ground, visit one of the live food shows along the pier and watch top chefs prepare their favourite dishes live on stage.

 

The Grape, Apple and Grain Festival traditionally takes place over the second weekend of the festival and is when you can enjoy a variety of craft beers, real ales & ciders, and sample a variety of street foods from all over Guernsey, whilst enjoying the live music and entertainment.

 

Capital St Peter Port offers a range of restaurants where you can have a bite to eat before venturing to one of Guernsey’s treasures: Castle Cornet, guarding Guernsey harbour and with fabulous views of the island and neighbouring Herm and Sark.

 

Visit Guernsey Food Festival in September - walking in Guernsey with Sherpa Expeditions

 

On day 3 of our Guernsey walking trip, you hike along more rugged terrain and get close to the coastline to see the largest cave in Guernsey, Le Creux Mahié. Then go up to Les Tielles, a beautiful part of the cliffs with fantastic views, and a great place for a picnic.

 

Sherpa Expeditions’ walking holiday further takes you around the Bailiwick of Guernsey, following the Channel Island Way. The 110-mile route circles the island in daily stages, usually around 5-6 hours per day. The route takes you from the Guernsey capital, St Peter Port, to Petit Bot Bay, onwards to Perelle Bay and back to St Peter Port where you can then catch a ferry to explore Sark and Herm. There’s also the option of continuing to Alderney to explore the third-largest Channel Island.

 

Visit Guernsey

  • The Guernsey Food Festival is organised by Visit Guernsey and is ‘the greatest food festival ever to arrive on Guernsey’s shores’. It celebrates the island’s culinary side and, as it takes place in September when average temperatures range around 18°C/64°F, is a fantastic time to visit the island.
  • Another big Guernsey event takes place annually, which is the Guernsey Heritage Festival - in 2018 from 30 March-10 May. This popular Festival returns for its fifth year and 2018 shines a spotlight on life in the Bailiwick of Guernsey under German rule and the islands’ subsequent liberation from the Occupying forces after WWII.

 

Text & images courtesy of Visit Guernsey.