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Nutrition Tips To Help Boost Energy And Recovery

It’s often said that if you do enough exercise, you can eat virtually anything you like. And after a couple of hours of hard walking or cycling, it’s very hard (in Britain, especially) not to pass up the opportunity of having a piece of cake or a cream tea of scones and jam in a local café... it can be all too easy in fact, to eat too much!

Therefore, it’s important to make sure you have a balanced and slowly continuous food intake, where possible; little and often being the key. You don’t need to eat a whole energy bar in one go for example, have a little bit and often. Endurance athletes know the problem, the best of them have a highly trained musculature that takes a long time to suffer from the glycogen exhaustion that a lot of beginners are effected with when blood and muscle glycogen levels fall. It is said that, at least for running, you only have enough glycogen storage for a 90 minute sustained effort, walking  perhaps 3 or 4 hours, so you need to be replenishing long before you anticipate an energy crash coming.

With this in mind, we have put together some simple nutrition tips for the best things to eat and drink to provide you with sustained energy whilst staying active and training for a big walking or cycling trip.
 
 

STARTING THE DAY

The first, and one of the most important things, is starting the day right. A cooked breakfast might seem like the way to go, but with a very high concentration of fats, protein and salts it can leave you feeling sluggish in the morning as you set out, whilst your body tries to digest everything. A better, and just as filling alternative, would be a nice bowl of porridge, perhaps with banana and honey or yoghurt stirred in. If you’re extra hungry, some toast with marmalade on the side wouldn’t go amiss. This will set you up with slow release carbohydrates as well as a good supply of initial sugars to get you going. 

A very popular breakfast hailing from Switzerland is Bircher muesli, a creation of Maximilian Bircher-Benner, a Swiss doctor and nutritionist. He developed it for patients at his Zurich sanatorium in the late 1800s with the aim of making his patients eat more raw fruit. The rolled oat based muesli is often soaked overnight in Swiss yoghurt making it easily digestible and then lots of mixed fresh and dried fruits are added. Within this you will get a mixture of complex carbohydrates, fruits, salts, sugars and fats. Fruits are an excellent source of elements, such as potassium in banana and vitamin c in berries and citrus fruits. It is also thought that vitamins help with energy processing, as well as promoting general wellbeing. 
 
 

DURING THE DAY

Once you are out and about what should you take with you? Of course there are an array of different sports bars, sports drinks and energy gels, which can be confusing. These vary in quality, some are nutritionally balanced and some are little more than sugar. Either way, they are not always necessarily the best option, and there are good alternatives that can be found in most supermarkets, usually in multiple packs. 

If you want to keep things more affordable, go for items such as Snickers bars or peanut M&Ms which have a good slow and fast energy release ingredients – glucose and protein. Nuts are more expensive, but if you add a few to some some dried fruit (such as raisins) and M&Ms, you have a reasonable trail mix that you can graze on throughout the day. Also, it’s always recommended to have a packet of Jelly Babies to hand as they are pure glucose, which gives us a hit of energy and are much more palatable than energy gels. A couple of apples are also handy. However, too much fruit and vitamin c can lead to RBM (rapid bowel movement), so don’t overdo it!

If you’d rather have a convenient bar to suit all needs, energy bars which have a mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat, such as the Cliff Bar are great. They generally aren’t chocolate covered so won’t melt easily, but can crumble. Anything labelled as a 'nutrition bar' is intended as a meal replacement, providing vitamins and minerals and often having more calories and protein. 

Rehydration is also very important, as you need to get a balance of liquid and salts without flushing the salts out of your system (hypernatremia). The easiest way to do this is to buy a tub of  rehydration powders to fill your water bottles with in the morning and then take a trusted brand of soluble rehydration tablet to put in your bottle for further refills during the day. 
 
 
 

ENDING THE DAY

When it comes to any strenuous exercise, the way you end your day is just as vital as the way you start. So once you’ve finished a long days walk or cycle, a lot of people feel either too tired to physically consume anything, or eat far too much without thinking about it. In Britain, it also seems to be customary to end your walk at a pub with a cold beer. This is definitely not to be sniffed at, as beer drinking is sociable, contains over 300 calories a pint (plus vitamins) and is easily consumed. The thing to remember is not to drink too much and remain hydrated, so a couple of pints is fine. Alongside your drink of choice, you should ideally eat something easily consumed straight after the exercise and then a little later have some protein to help with muscle repair. 

Don't forget, it was only a couple of generations ago, that good hikers were completing extraordinary walks relying on jam sandwiches, homemade cake and a thermos of sweet tea (and some still do!) Food to is meant to be enjoyable and walking sociable, so the key is to listen to your body and perhaps don’t turn up that chance for a cream tea!
 
 

Coast to Coast Guided Walk in Pictures

In June 2019 we took a lovely bunch of people on a Guided Coast to Coast walk. The weather was pretty soggy during the first week, but the walkers' spirits were definitely not dampened! They hung on in there with no complaining, and were rewarded with some much brighter weather for the second half of the walk, before they finally made it to the beach at Robin Hood's Bay.
 
Here are a few photos from the walk. If you're inspired to join a guided Coast to Coast walk, or you fancy taking it on as self-guided trip, click here.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Every journey has its first step! The group at the start of the walk in St Bees.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Climbing the steps from Fleswick Bay, with the sun shining!
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Ennerdale Water - rough walking and choppy waters.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
The hard descent from Greenup Edge - especially in wet weather. Care is needed!
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
The group preparing to start off from Glenriding - laden with cooked breakfasts, thermos flasks and biscuits.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
The long, steep ascent towards the High Street junction to Kidsty Pike, the highest point on the Coast to Coast, with heads down against the wind!
 
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Resting down by Hawes Water after the long descent from Kidsty Pike - and the sun had come out!
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Millstone cairn descending into upper Swaledale.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
East Gill Force, Keld.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Starting the day from Keld at East Gill Force.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Beautiful Swaledale from near Crackpot Hall, Keld.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Single file please! Walking across the beautiful pastures near Muker, on the low-level route to Reeth.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
A traditional 'Laithe' stone, winter-feed hay barn - which often also served to house a couple of cows over winter.
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
The group commencing the traverse of the Cleveland Hills.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Ascending Live Moor - with some bits of heather already out.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Outside a shooters' hut near Great Fryupdale.
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
Reaching the coast again - just 3.5 miles to go until Robin Hood's Bay!
 
 
Guided Coast to Coast Walk
And they made it! On the beach at Robin Hood's Bay, and the end of another fantastic guided Coast to Coast walk with Sherpa Expeditions.
 
If you're inspired to join a guided Coast to Coast walk, or you fancy taking it on as self-guided trip, click here.
 
 
 
 

Useful French Phrases for Your Next Walking Holiday in France

useful french phrases on holiday with Sherpa Expeditions

 

When hiking in the French countryside on one of our grande randonnées (long distance trails), you may occasionally like to have a chat with the locals. Perhaps you like to learn a bit more about their culture and cuisine or you simply like to ask for a direction. This list of useful French phrases may come in handy on your next walking holiday in France – do not forget to work on your pronunciation though!

 

Should I go left / right / straight / or turnaround?.............  

Est-ce que je dois aller a gauche / a droite / tout droit / ou bien est-ce que je dois faire demi-tour?

How far is it until the next village?........................................


A combien est le prochain village?
Where can I find a toilet?..........................................................

sont les toilettes?


When was this castle built?.....................................................



Quand est-ce que ce château a été construit?

Can I enter this church / castle / cemetery / cathedral?...  

Est que l’on peut visiter cette église / ce château / ce cimetière / cette cathédrale?

I would like 1/2/3/4 entrance tickets.....................................


Je voudrais un / deux / trois / quatre tickets.

 

What is the best restaurant in town?....................................


Quel est le meilleur restaurant de la ville?

What is this dish called?............................................................

Comment s’appelle ce plat?

Of course you'd like to be prepared to understand the answer in French. So when you're in the Luberon, you may expect to hear ratatouille as the answer, in Ardeche perhaps crique or bombine (both potato-based) and in the Cevennes soup aux chataignes (chestnut soup). When in Dordogne you may prepare for a response like cassoulet (stew), in Tarn & Aveyron aligot (cheese & potatoes), and in the Loire your dessert may well be the famous tarte-tatin.


Where can I do some wine tasting?........................................


Est-ce qu'il y a une dégustation de vin dans les environs?

What time do you serve dinner?.............................................

A quelle heure servez-vous le diner?

I am a vegetarian / vegan.........................................................

Je suis végétarien / végétalien.

I am allergic to gluten / nuts / lactose...................................

Je suis allergique au gluten / aux noix / aux produits laitiers.


Where is the nearest supermarket?......................................



Où est le super marché le plus près?


I had a wonderful sleep.............................................................

 


Dormez bien. / Bonne nuit.

Good morning! / Good evening................................................

Bonjour! / Bonsoir. 

Thank you! / Excuse me / Sorry...............................................

Merci! / Excusez-moi / Pardon

We hope these French words proof useful on your next walking holiday to the beautiful European country and that they will help you find your way around. Have a look below the image (which shows a small group of hikers doing the TMB) to find some ideas for popular walking holidays in France – or contact our team of travel experts to discuss your queries.

 

Useful french words on walking holidays in France - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Popular walking holidays in France


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Rooms with a View: The Mountain Hut Book

Cicerone - The Mountain Hut Book - Sherpa ExpeditionsOur friends at Cicerone publishing house have released yet another fascinating book, this time celebrating the mountain huts that dot the European Alps and Pyrenees in The Mountain Hut Book.

 

Author Kev Reynolds has been compiling travel guide books since the late 1970s and has an undiminished passion for mountains and the countryside. With his enthusiasm, personal anecdotes and authority, we at Sherpa are already a big fan of the publication.

 

The book explores the development of alpine mountain huts from primitive and often squalid beginnings to a valuable network for people who venture into the mountains. Whether you are new to the experience of staying in huts, or are an old hand, we believe that the book will bring you lots of entertainment and information.

 

Drawing on Reynolds’ long experience of staying in hundreds of mountain refuges, the new book examines hut life, what facilities to expect, and hut etiquette. For example: reserve your spots in advance, cancel if your plans change in order to make space for other hikers, bring a pair of ‘hut shoes’ to wear indoors, or make your bed once you’ve been allocated a room & spot.

 

 

congratulations

Sherpa Expeditions gave away one copy of the book following a small competition on our Facebook page that ran in May 2018. The lucky winner of 'The Mountain Hut Book' is Char Aaberg from Canada. 

Would you like to get  hold of a copy of the book as well? Head over to the webshop of Cicerone to order yours, and because we're friends, you receive a 20% discount on your order >> find more information here.

 

The Mountain Hut Book has profiles of the author’s 10 favourite huts in the Alps and Pyrenees, gives the best approach routes and offers suggestions for ascents and outings from them. 10 hut-to-hut walking tours of between 3 and 13 days duration are also outlined, including the Tour of the Bernina and the Alta Via 2.

 

>> Learn more about Cicerone and how you can claim 20% discount on books when you travel with Sherpa Expeditions.

 

 

On Track – Q&A on Walking in France’s Tarn and Aveyron Region

Today’s frequently asked questions are answered by walking blogger Charles Hawes, who was in the French region of Aveyron in September to walk along some typical French villages on our Medieval France: Tarn and Aveyron walking holiday. If you like to read more about the trip, have a look at this Traveller Tale or at Walking the Blog on which Charles made a separate post for each walking day and illustrated the walks with many professional photographs.

 

most-beautiful-villages-in-France-with-Sherpa-Expeditions

 

#1 What was the weather like in autumn and was it good for walking?

Temperature wise the weather was near-perfect when I did this walk in late September 2017. Not too hot or cold. When it was sunny, we were walking comfortably in T-shirts/base layers. We had several days when it started off quite misty but by midday it was sunny and warm. We had just one morning when it rained but that blew over by early afternoon.

 

#2 What is special about trekking in this part of France?

This walking holiday in France is for the most part gentle rolling countryside; though you will cross some quite steep river valleys. One of the things that struck me and my travel partner, and we enjoyed, was that it was so quiet! So even when walking on minor roads, you will seldom be passed by any vehicles. I think we came across other serious walkers just once in 5 days. It can give a quite special feeling like having the place to yourselves! The route takes you through many tiny hamlets and small villages and many, many abandoned buildings. Even the smallest places had great character. But the main villages – several of which are listed as some of the “Plus Beaux Villages de France” – were all exceptionally pretty.

 

locals-walking-holidays-in-France-with-Sherpa-Expeditions

 

Cordes-walking-holidays-in-France-with-Sherpa-Expeditions

 

#3 Is it easy to communicate with the local people?

On this walk, you will probably not see that many other people! For a large part you will be on a Grand Randonnee (GR46), but it would likely not be very busy at any time of the year. All the bed & breakfast and hotel owners were very friendly, welcoming and helpful. I guess it all depends how good your French is. Mine is pretty poor but we got by OK.

 

#4 Are there enough places on the route to go for a drink or a snack?

There are very few places that you walk through during the day where you could stop for a drink or a coffee. Most of the time I didn’t mind this except for once or twice when we would have loved to have found a café. In the larger villages you will have more options though; we enjoyed a lovely break at Penne in a café with a fabulous view over the river valley.

 

#5 What 3 items should others definitely pack for this walking holiday in France?

Do make sure you are carrying enough water. There are very few public toilets or drinking taps along the route and though I am sure anyone would be happy to fill up a water bottle for you, you may not find anyone to ask. Talking of toilets, I always carry toilet paper and a plastic trowel – much nicer to make sure your visit is not noticed! A French phrase book or translation app on your phone is handy.

 

walking-holidays-in-France-with-Sherpa-Expeditions

 

#6 How would you describe the landscape of Tarn & Aveyron?

On this walking holiday in France, you will find a landscape that is well-wooded with familiar species of trees – oaks and chestnut, for instance. There are a lot of Buxus (Box trees) throughout the area, which is relatively unusual in the UK. The architecture is very different from the UK, which makes this part of France so interesting.

 

#7 What extra costs did you make on this trip?

The only things you will need to pay for will be your drinks and some of the evening meals. With the value of the pound having dropped by over 20% in recent months gone are the days of bargain menus and cheap wine. Wine in restaurants was probably the same as we’d pay in the UK, but the beers were eye-wateringly expensive almost everywhere – it was not unusual to pay 4 euros for a small beer.

 

#8 Can you describe this trip in one sentence?

This circular walk has impressively well been put together; it was a delight from start to finish.

 

 

Did you like this Q&A and would you like to get similar details of one of our other active Europe holidays? We’d be happy to hear about your suggestions.

Or if you like to be among the firsts to hear about the latest On Track Q&A destination, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter here

 

On Track – Q&A on Walking in Tenerife

To give you a deeper understanding of our cycling and walking holidays in Europe, we like to introduce you to the On Track feature. This is a series of quick Q&A’s on a specific trip from the Sherpa Expeditions offer.

Today’s FAQs (frequently asked questions) are answered by resident guide John, who is one of our experts on walking in Tenerife.

 

Hike up Mt Teide volcano in Tenerife - Sherpa walking holidays

 

#1 What aspects about the weather make Tenerife great for walking?

 

Tenerife has a pleasant sub-tropical climate with average daily maximums of over 20°C throughout the year, but it rarely gets too hot outside of high summer because of the prevalent north-easterly Trade Winds and because the island is cooled by the Canary Current. This means that temperatures are slightly cooler than would normally be expected at this latitude and keeps temperatures in the high-twenties rather than the mid-thirties.

The sun is very strong so you do need to use sunscreen and wear loose fitting clothes. The island is pleasant for walking year-round. Trekking on the coast and up in the mountains in winter time can be slightly colder due to winds and the altitude you gain.

 

#2 What is special about walking in Tenerife?

Clean air, fantastic lapis blue sea views over to other islands, extensive well waymarked trails, and the chance of finding a small bar or restaurant to take in a fish dish or tapas while drinking a nice glass of wine or golden beer. There is a great cheap bus service on Tenerife which enables you to really explore and do some full day walks. It doesn’t take too long to get to starting points and really get walking on some great mountain and coastal trails.

 

Walking in Tenerife - Sherpa Expeditions

 

Tenerife is great for year-round walking - Sherpa Expeditions

 

#3 What language do people speak?

Spanish is the language of Tenerife, with local dialects. It would be worth learning a few phrases in Spanish such as greetings, but many people who work in the hospitality sector speak some English. Being polite and asking if people understand English is always a virtue.

 

#4 As Tenerife is such a well-known island, are there still quiet places?

The island is quite densely populated on sections along the coast such as Los Cristianos, Puerto de la Cruz and Santa Cruz de Tenerife. There are also vast sections of cliffs and coast where there are just small holdings or wild terrain, you’ll discover these while walking in the Canary Island. In the interior of Tenerife, where the slopes of Mount Teide and the volcanic Caldera rise, there are very few settlements and it becomes a barren moonscape.

 

#5 Will we encounter other walkers on this trip in Tenerife?

The island of Tenerife is very popular with Dutch, German and British travellers. They usually come either for the beaches or for hiking and some of the paths do get a lot of traffic, but you will rarely feel as if you are in the crowds. At times around Mount Teide it can get busier due to the arrival of coach tourists.

 

Walking in Tenerife with Sherpa Expeditions

 

Try local food in Tenerife - Sherpa walking holidays

 

#6 To what other region in the world can you compare Tenerife?

Well, you can compare a walking trip in Tenerife to the other volcanic islands around: such as La Gomera, La Palma, Hierro, Gran Canaria, and of course Madeira and the Azores, although these latter are much greener islands. Then globally, you can compare the landscape to the volcanic areas in Central America: Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and parts of Mexico, these also have similar Spanish or Portuguese colonial heritage.

 

#7 What extra costs will I have on Sherpa’s Tenerife walking trip?

You can find very keenly priced restaurants and well-priced drinks as well as some very expensive places. What is nice is discovering a traditional restaurant that the locals are using and having a meal with a local wine for under EUR 25. Buses are cheap and you can purchase a Bono travel card for EUR 15-25 on arrival and keep it topped up for bus transfers. There is 1 bag transfer to Puerto de la Cruz (EUR 75) on day 3 of our Tenerife walking holiday, this has to be paid directly to your hotelier on arrival.

 

We hope this information has indeed answered some of the questions you may have had on walking in Tenerife. If you have other queries, please get in touch with John and the Sherpa team via phone or email.

 

Did you like this Q&A and would you like to get similar details of one of our other active Europe holidays? We’d be happy to hear about your suggestions.

Or if you like to be among the firsts to hear about the latest On Track Q&A destination, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter here.  

 

Waymarked trails in Tenerife for walking - Sherpa Expeditions

 

On Track – Q&A on Guernsey Holidays on Foot

Guernsey Holidays FAQ answered by Sherpa Expeditions

 

To give you a deeper understanding of our cycling and walking holidays in Europe, we like to introduce you to our On Track feature. This is a series of quick Q&A’s on a specific trip from the Sherpa Expeditions offer.

Today’s frequently asked questions are answered by resident guide John, who was in Guernsey last year to see what there is to do on the Channel Island and to select the best trails for our new Guernsey Islands – Channel Island Way trip.

"Guernsey: An active holiday filled with quiet island hopping and coastal bliss!"

#1 Doesn’t the English weather on the Guernsey Islands prevent good walking possibilities?

The Guernsey climate is amongst the mildest and sunniest in the whole of the British Isles, being warmed by the adjacent Gulf Stream and so much further south. Every year, the Island of Guernsey enjoys up to 2,000 hours of sunny weather. During the summer months, the weather is not only sunny, with average daytime temperatures of anywhere between 20°C / 68°F and 25°C / 77°F, but also extremely dry.

April, May and June tend to be the driest months on Guernsey, when precipitation levels rarely top 120 mm / 4.7 inches for this entire period.

 

#2 What is special about Guernsey walks?

Guernsey and her islands have extensive white sandy beaches and medium-high cliffs with beautiful views. In, at least spring and early summer, this is being topped by some lovely flowers. It is all a little old-fashioned and each of the islands has a unique pace of life and history. Alderney Island seems wilder and has some great bird watching opportunities, Sark Island is a bucolic beauty, and Herm Island has lovely grass backed beaches. Guernsey Island has the most variety and is of course bigger.

 

Sark - Channel Island Way, Sherpa Expeditions walking holidays

 

St Peter Port on walks in Guernsey - Sherpa Expeditions

 

#3 What language do people speak on the Guernsey Islands?

The Channel Islands were possessions of the Dukes of Normandy and when after 1066 they took over England, the islands were attached to the English crown. Although most place names and streets are in French, the Guernsey language ‘Guernésiais’, is a Norman French tongue, and you won’t hear much being spoken. People sound English generally and most who speak French are French tourists.

 

#4 What is a Guernsey holiday and exploring the island on foot like?

Guernsey is certainly getting busier. In the height of summer there are lots of holidaymakers on the beaches, in the capital St Peter Port and on the sister islands. At the same time, there is a surprising amount of countryside and this results in the coastal footpaths, except for perhaps on Herm, not being very busy. When approaching popular beaches, old Nazis fort sites, or when walking through towns it can be a little busier though. There is a surprising lack of development by a lot of the beaches and there are few kiosks or cafes on the Guernsey walks. Out of the high season, there are generally few people around.

 

Sunset on Guernsey holidays, Sherpa walking holidays

 

#5 What 3 items should we pack for a walk in Guernsey?

  • Binoculars... to spot the birdlife, such as puffins on Herm and a large Gannet colony on L’Etacs rocks of Alderney, and woodland birds Guernsey and Sark. You can even use them to spot seals on Herm Island and binoculars are useful for viewing the islands and Normandy from the varying islands,
  • Swimming costume... if it is warm enough, and
  • Sunglasses & sunscreen.

 

#6 What extra costs will we make on this trip?

Walkers on this Guernsey holiday must set aside extra budget for ferries to Herm and Sark and the flight to Alderney. Other expenses will be for airport taxis or bus transfers and dinners, lunches and coffees & other drinks. Generally, things are slightly more expensive than much of the UK and the British pound is accepted. Guernsey does have its own currency however, the Guernsey pound, which has been used on the Channel Islands since 1921 and Guernsey still has its own £1 note, as well as a £50, £20, £10 and £5 note like mainland Britain. Some shops also accept Euros and major credit cards are widely accepted throughout the islands. The other way around, Channel Islands notes and coins are not accepted in the UK.

There is no VAT in Guernsey but it is not a duty-free island. ATM machines are available at most high street banks in St Peter Port, the airport and selected sites, including supermarkets, garages and some out of town banks throughout the island.

 

 

We hope this information has indeed answered some of the questions you may have had on Guernsey holidays. If you have other queries, please get in touch with John and the Sherpa team via phone or email.

 

Did you like this Q&A and would you like to get similar details of one of our other active Europe holidays? We’d be happy for you to tell us about your suggestions.

Or if you like to be among the firsts to hear about the latest On Track Q&A destination, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter here.  


 

On Track - Q&A on Hiking Norway’s Fjords

Norway Hiking FAQ - Sherpa Expeditions

 

To give you a deeper understanding of our cycling and walking holidays in Europe, we like to introduce you to our new On Track feature. Today is the first in a series of quick Q&A’s on a specific trip in our offer. We conducted this inaugural Q&A with resident guide John who was in Norway earlier this month where he hiked the routes of our The Fjordland walking trip. We describe this Norway hiking trip as

 

"A wide-ranging introduction to trekking in Norway, featuring a range of walks of different standards, in differential scenery".

Get a better understanding of The Fjordland walking trip and what you may expect of walking in Norway via the below questions and answers.

 

#1  What is special about hiking in Norway?

I think you could say there is a frontier, wild feeling to hiking in Norway. The scenery can be bleak and beautiful in places with expansive vistas over distant lakes. There are tracks of forest and then you find the fjords with the most dramatic scenery imaginable.

 

#2  To what other region in the world can you compare the Norwegian landscape?

Norway has aspects that are similar to Sweden of course, but it can also be similar to parts of Scotland and Iceland. There are moderate fells and glacial features. Norway has the same geology to parts of the Scottish Highlands and let’s face it, similar weather - southern Norway is on quite the same latitude as Northern Scotland.

 

Fjords and Lakes in Norway - Sherpa Expeditions

 

glacier on a hike in Norway fjordland - Sherpa Expeditions

 

#3  Doesn’t this Norwegian climate prevent good trekking possibilities?

Norwegian weather is frontal and fickle, it can do anything at these latitudes, there is great trekking here but you should be prepared with your clothing (good shells and layering) and have a positive attitude. The weather changes all the time. All being well, there should be enough walks of different standards in our package to enable you to cope with the vagaries of weather, as well as other things to do!

The walking remains dramatic in all different types of weather.

#4  Will we encounter other walkers on this trip?

It depends whether it is the weekend and where you are. On most of the walks in my week in July, I have seen between 5 and 12 people, it isn't a lot. Maybe on the more tourist oriented routes like from Myrdal to Flam you would see a few dozen, but mostly on bikes.

Most Norwegians have good English and although it is worth having a phrase book, generally the people speak our English language very freely... like the Dutch or Danes.

hike up prestholtskarvet in Norway - Sherpa Expeditions

 

norway hiking holidays with Sherpa Expeditions

 

#5  Are there enough places on the route for a drink or a snack?

On the walks, there are very few places where you can buy refreshments and some of the huts are unmanned. There are a couple of cafes on a couple of the routes. These are quite charming; one is for example in an old farm and another used to be a railwayman's house. A lot of the emphasis when walking in Norway is on the self-reliant experience.

 

#6  What 3 items should I pack for a Norway hiking trip?

  • Walking poles... a great help on snow patches and long steep descents. 
  • Shell clothing including gaiters... you need to be waterproof as much as possible
  • Duty free... save yourself a fortune on drinks.

We hope this information has indeed answered some of the questions you may have had. If you have other queries, please get in touch with John and the Sherpa team via phone or email.

 

Did you like this Q&A and would you like to get similar details of one of our other active Europe holidays? We’d be happy for you to tell us about your suggestions.

Or if you like to be among the firsts to hear about the latest On Track Q&A destination, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter here.  

 

Norway walking holidays with Sherpa Expeditions